Healogics under federal investigation

Jacksonville-based Healogics, which runs wound care centers across the U.S., has been accused of performing unnecessary hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients in an apparent scheme to defraud Medicare, former employees said in a False Claims Act suit unsealed Wednesday in a federal court.

Willie and Michelle Arnold, a former hyperbaric technologist and a former hyperbaric safety director at Healogics respectively, allege that more than half the hyperbaric treatments the company billed to Medicare were fraudulent, according to the qui tam suit, which was first filed in July 2014.

http://www.bizjournals.com/jacksonville/news/2015/10/06/federal-lawsuit-healogics-billed-for-unnecessary.html

Medicare will require Prior Authorization of Non-Emergent (HBO) Therapy in 2015

HYPERBARIC tech blog (hbotechblog.com)

-By Roque Wicker

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CMS has just announced that starting March 2015 three states (Illinois, Michigan, and New Jersey) will be required to get “Pre-authorizations” for the next three years for non-emergent hyperbaric treatments for the following indications:
1. Chronic refractory osteomyelitis
2. Diabetic lower extremity wounds (Wagner 3 and above).
3. Osteoradionecrosis.
4. Preparation and preservation of compromised skin grafts and flaps.
5. Soft tissue radionecrosis.
6. Actinomycrosis.
The decision was made due to “high incidences of improper payments for these services”.

Authorization times will vary from 10-20 business days and as little as 2 days for “imminent” treatment for a life or limb threatening indication.

According to the memo A provisional affirmative prior authorization decision, justified by the beneficiary’s condition, may affirm up to 36 treatments in a 12-month period.

To read more about this please click the links below:
Insurance news HBO article

CMS prior auth process

CMS…

View original post 5 more words

Decompression Sickness in Miami

We just heard about a friends daughter getting 8 hyperbaric treatments for what sounds like at least a type 2 DCS or possibly an AGE (she is completely paralyzed on one side) and symptoms have not subsided. We are unsure about what type of chamber was used but it was at a FL hospital, nor do we know how long the treatments were or the depth of each treatment.

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It’ll be interesting to see if the patient was treated with any US NAVY Dive Tables (not monoplace modified tables).

Any comments on this would be great.
If if your facility does receive such symptoms without any dive information (if patient doesn’t recall any of the depths and dive times) how would you treat this patient? How deep, how long?

The Relationship Between HBO Patient Education, Patient Satisfaction, Compliance, and Reimbursement

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Have you ever wondered why your patients quit hyperbaric therapy? Why would they quit despite the fact that they could potentially lose a toe or a foot? Sure a certain percentage of them are claustrophobic, some of them listened to their archaic physicians negative viewpoint of HBOT, some just do not care and have given up, then there are the ones we put in that “uncategorized box” because we really couldn’t pinpoint their rational, instead we categorize these patients simply as “NON-COMPLIANT”.

Are these patients really non-compliant or are they just uninformed and improperly educated? One should ask, “Who in the right mind would sacrifice losing a limb vs going in a chamber for two hours a day watching TV to save the limb in question?” Ask yourself the same question and if you are educated enough and informed enough (and not out of your mind) about the pros of HBOT and the cons of losing a limb, you surely wouldn’t opt for an amputation if you knew there was a possibility of saving that limb. So back to my original question, Why? Is there a possibility that the patient/s were not properly educated on how hyperbaric therapy works and the importance of “daily” treatments explained to them in a way they could understand? In this article I would like to describe the important relationship between improved and effective patient education, patient compliance, patient satisfaction, and value based reimbursement.

Read the whole article here: THE RELATIONSHIP OF PT EDUCATION ON HBO COMPLIANCE PT SATISFACTION AND REIMBURSEMENT

Patient Safety Instructions Card now available exclusively from Best Publishing

Order your Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Patient Safety Instructions today and watch your patient compliance increase along with outcomes, patient satisfaction, and your clinic’s value-based reimbursement!

Have you ever wondered why your patients quit hyperbaric therapy? A clinicians’ work doesn’t stop at technical and clinical know-how in today’s healthcare setting. Although these are essential, so too are the human skills such as customer service, effective patient teaching skills, and service recovery (how to deal with a not so happy patient and recover their business). Almost every hospital in America (if they are even slightly concerned about getting paid) has an in-house or outsourced department that specifically tracks patient satisfaction as well as provides the appropriate training for those that have not yet proven proficient in customer service.
Does Your Clinic Want to Increase:

-Patient Compliance
-Value-based reimbursement
-Outcomes
-Patient satisfaction

If you answered yes to any of the above, this is the perfect product for you!

“Studies find that patients that are more educated about their therapy are more satisfied and compliant with treatment recommendations and that there is a direct association between patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes” Source: Journal For Patient Compliance

As healthcare providers, it is important that we understand the relationship between improved and effective patient education, patient compliance, patient satisfaction, and value-based reimbursement. Let this product work for you!

Get yours today!!!

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The Relationship Between HBO Patient Education, Patient Satisfaction, Compliance, and Reimbursement

Image

Have you ever wondered why your patients quit hyperbaric therapy? Why would they quit despite the fact that they could potentially lose a toe or a foot? Sure a certain percentage of them are claustrophobic, some of them listened to their archaic physicians negative viewpoint of HBOT, some just do not care and have given up, then there are the ones we put in that “uncategorized box” because we really couldn’t pinpoint their rational, instead we categorize these patients simply as “NON-COMPLIANT”.

Are these patients really non-compliant or are they just uninformed and improperly educated? One should ask, “Who in the right mind would sacrifice losing a limb vs going in a chamber for two hours a day watching TV to save the limb in question?” Ask yourself the same question and if you are educated enough and informed enough (and not out of your mind) about the pros of HBOT and the cons of losing a limb, you surely wouldn’t opt for an amputation if you knew there was a possibility of saving that limb. So back to my original question, Why? Is there a possibility that the patient/s were not properly educated on how hyperbaric therapy works and the importance of “daily” treatments explained to them in a way they could understand? In this article I would like to describe the important relationship between improved and effective patient education, patient compliance, patient satisfaction, and value based reimbursement.

Read the whole article here: THE RELATIONSHIP OF PT EDUCATION ON HBO COMPLIANCE PT SATISFACTION AND REIMBURSEMENT